Fairmont Château Laurier | A story book building

 Dave and his creation!

Dave and his creation!

  Chaos in the kitchen - Scene created by our very own Bonsai Chef and master modeller, Dan Notley, who was inspired by the work of Roger Blachon's painting 'The Kitchen'.

Chaos in the kitchen - Scene created by our very own Bonsai Chef and master modeller, Dan Notley, who was inspired by the work of Roger Blachon's painting 'The Kitchen'.

  The grand foyer created by Model Citizen, Anita Fenton. 

The grand foyer created by Model Citizen, Anita Fenton. 

  A wedding party scene created by Dr. Detail, Spencer Barclay.

A wedding party scene created by Dr. Detail, Spencer Barclay.

Prepare to stop and stare because one of the most anticipated buildings of our Ottawa destination is now complete!  The team has added the finishing touches to the Fairmont Chateau Laurier: a story book in structure form.  Lead designer, David Domanksi and our team have created a building that replicates the intricacies of the historic Canadian structure and one that will captivate all who pass it by.

This beautiful gothic style structure is detailed with approximately 700 3D printed pieces with a cutaway that allows us giants to enjoy the tiny stories within. The rooms and hallways are lit with 473 LED lights so all our miniature guests can wander about and a total of 761 windows that line the walls of this 9-story miniature structure. And for some added fun, the team took on a little design challenge by each re-designing a standard hotel room into a scene of their choice. Check out some of the rooms below – there’s a pop culture reference to suit everyone’s needs.

Interesting Fact: The Fairmont Chateau Laurier was designated as a National Historic site of Canada in 1981.  The hotel shares a fascinating story with the R.M.S Titanic.  The hotel was officially planned to open on April 26 1912.  Unfortunately, all of the furniture for the hotel rooms was aboard the Titanic when it sank on April 15, 1912. The hotel opened a few months later on June 12, 1912.

After eleven months and approximately 215 coffees, this amazing creation is one the team should be proud of and a wonderful tribute to such an iconic Canadian structure.

Camille Wodka